Alan Moore related compilation 3 CDs

I have made this CD set last year, it contains Alan Moore related music from my collection.
First CD has studio recording of The Satanic Nurses / Emperors of Ice Cream (second incarnation). Longer version of ‘The Murders on the Rue Morgue’ (track 2) can be found on Storyteller CD, listed as The Satanic Nurses. Track 1 and 3 are sourced from the same recording so they could be Nurses tracks as well. Some Emperors tracks can be found on Storyteller CD also but there are few unreleased songs there like ‘London’, ‘Positively Bridge Street’ and Intro.
CD 2 has the live recording of Emperors UFO gig mentioned in ‘Magic Words: The Extraordinary Life of Alan Moore‘ book, studio version of Emperors take on ‘Old Gangsters Never Die’ and 2 tracks with Pat Fish (‘Trampling Tokyo’ also available on Storyteller CD).
CD 3 has some odd tracks taken from old tapes including Alex Green’s home demos for the early Emperors of Ice Cream from ’78, instrumental demos of Mystery Guest‘s ‘Wurlitzer Junction’, live versions of Mystery Guests songs with Alan Moore lyrics, D-Go-Tees versions of 2 early Emperors songs and a D-Go-Tees song with Alan Moore lyrics.

CD 1

01, Another Suburban Romance 4:01
02, The Murders on the Rue Morgue 4:55
03, Fires I’d Wish I’d Seen 3:20
04, London 5:03
05, Me And Dorothy Parker 3:39
06, Mr A 3:50
07, Positively Bridge Street 4:29
08, Another Suburban Romance slightly different version 4:09
09, The Intro Of Ice Cream 3:00
10, The Murders on the Rue Morgue different shorter version 4:38

CD 2

01, Another Suburban Romance (live) 4:11
02, The Murders on the Roe Morgue (live) 3:42
03, Positively Bridge Street (live) 4:06
04, Me And Dorothy Parker (live) 3:29
05, Mr. A (live) 3:19
06, White Light / White Heat (Velvet Underground) (live) 4:25
07, Old Gangsters Never Die (studio) 11:32
08, London (different version) (Pat Fish / Alan Moore) 4:43
09, Trampling Tokyo (Pat Fish / Alan Moore) 5:33

CD 3

01, Wurlitzer Junction Mystery Guests guitar demo #1 1:25
02, Skyscraper early Emperors instrumental demo ’78 1:29
03, Do The Bum’s Rush (written by Alex Green for the Emperors) instrumental demo ’78 2:24
04, Whore’s Poem part 1 – Mystery Guests live ’81 0:57
05, Whore’s Poem part 2 – Mystery Guests live ’81 1:58
06, Wurlitzer Junction Mystery Guests guitar demo #2 1:27
07, Do The Bum’s Rush (written by Alex Green for the Emperors) D-Go-Tees demo 2:17
08, The Merry Shark You Are Mystery Guests live ’81 2:48
09, Sweet Potatoes Warbling (written by Alex Green for the Emperors) D-Go-Tees demo 2:42
10, The Age of Bavaria D-Go-Tees demo (written by Alan Moore/Glyn Bush) 2:39
11, Wurlitzer Junction full instrumental demo by Alex Green / Pickle 2:14

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Kevin Haskins / Alex Green – Moneymen session

Around May 1993 Kevin Haskins (The Submerged Tenth, Bauhaus, Love & Rockets, Satanic Nurses) and Alex Green (The Emperors of Ice Cream, The Sinister Ducks) went to studio to record demo music for Dennis Hopper film ‘Moneymen’.
They recorded two songs, first one was a metallic cover of Berry Gordy’s ‘Money’ (previously covered by The Beatles). Second one was described as ‘a sort of Northampton-Gothic-Meets-The-Beastie-Boys type rap’ by Alex Green.
Unforunately both songs remained unreleased.

“The cover of Money was recorded at Far Heath Studios in Northamptonshire and the engineer was Angus Wallace. I think that I programmed all the instruments and the vocalist was Will Matthews”
Kevin Haskins

Mr. Liquorice

Mr. Liquorice pseudonym was used by Pickle (Mystery Guests) as a solo artist. He did a few live gigs under that name in ’81 and ‘released’ his songs on a cassette called ‘Limbo Trains’. He also produced a one-off fanzine with David J of Bauhaus which has strips by Alan Moore.

The fanzine that David J and I did together was called TV Murders and was a kind of an anti-fanzine in that it featured no reviews or gig-listings of any kind. Only surrealistic cut-ups and montages. Another commercial hi-point.
Pickle (Mr. Licquorice)

Later in 1983 he contributed some background noises to ‘The Gospel According To Fear’ (b-side track of David J’s debut single) and he did transcription of another David J composition ‘This Vicious Cabaret’ for ‘V for Vendetta’ comic.

1981

1 August:
First Mr.Liquorice live gig @ Roadmender Club, Northampton

The second Sinister Ducks’ gig was at an event i promoted called ‘The Summer Shock Special’ at the Roadmender which utilised nearly all the rooms in the building for various events and performances. Red and green food and snacks were on sale. Was also my solo debut as Mr Liquorice.
Also on the bill were The Sinister Ducks,The D-Go-tees,a performance group called Living Room
Pickle (Mr. Licquorice)

7 October:
Live gig with Alex Green, he provided sax for 2 songs including Summer Sock Hotel.

9 October:
Live gig with The De-Goo-Tees.

De-Go-Tees @ Square Club

De-Go-Tees @ Square Club

22 October:
‘LIMBO TRAINS’ tape came out. It has ‘several dozen mini masterpieces’ including Summer Shock Hotel, The Cut-Glass Rodeo and Limbo Trains. It also includes a short instrumental version of an old Dapper Choir song called ‘Caption Music’.

Mr. Liquorice - Limbo Trains tape

Mr. Liquorice – Limbo Trains tape

Satanic Nurses (1989-1991)

„PT: Who are the people you’ve been working with?
AM: There’s Curtis who used to be in Venus Flytrap and before that The Gift, he’s really ace. There’s Chris Barber on bass – I’ve known him since I was 17, he used to be in the Arts Lab. Tim Perkins who’s currently also playing with Eric, he’s a brilliant violinist. Then there’s Kevin Haskins on drums from Love & Rockets. It all came together by accident. I was asked to do a track on a compilation of local bands, they wanted me on it because I was a famous cartoonist and they figured it would be good to have a famous somebody on the album even if it was a famous house decorator or something. But we enjoyed doing it and did some more and now we have two or three tracks in the can and we’re really happy with it; excitement is a good chemistry. RCA are apparently interested in bringing out the album so that looks nice.”
Ptolemaic Terrascope issue 8, 1991

Line-up [Alan Moore (Vocals), Kevin Haskins (Drums), Chris Barber (Bass), Tim Perkins (Guitar), Curtis E Johnson (Guitar)] is absolutely correct, Pete Brownjohn took over on drums when Kevin’s tour schedule for Love and Rockets kicked in. He had to give his regular band priority.
Tim Perkins

I belive that Kevin moving to America was the reason that he left although I belive that that band was called the Emperrors of ice cream.
Curtis E. Johnson

Don’t think you can say Kevin ever left as such – it was more a recording project where we got together every so often – no fixed line up really…
I remember being asked to play bass on the project, probably by Curtis E Johnson. I was involved with previous projects with Alan (Moore) since the formation of Northampton arts lab, when I was a teenager, so it was renewing an old acquaintance. I’m sorry I can’t be more specific about dates/gigs, but I don’t remember it as a gigging band, more a recording project…..
There were several tracks recorded over quite a long time period. I don’t remember all the titles. The other one that springs to mind is ‘Another Suburban Romance’
Chris Barber

„THE SATANIC NURSES: “…MORGUE” (4m29s) or, “MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE”
8-track master-reel. (4mins29s). Recorded 29 March 1990. Cold Spring Records, Northampton.
Group including:
Alan Moore (Vocals)
Kevin Haskins (Drums)
Chris Barber (Bass)
Tim Perkins (Guitar)
Curtis E Johnson (Guitar)
Engineer – Mark Thomas
Currently on loan to me from Justin Mitchell of Cold Spring. For further details see the Cold Spring website (discography). Trying to find somewhere to convert it to CD format cheaply… (lyrics printed in Negative Burn and then Alan Moore’s Songbook, as “Murders in the Rue Morgue”. An original song from the 1970s incarnation of Moore and Alex Green’s band, The Emperors of Ice Cream. Confirmed to me by Alex Green. All other songs from Negative Burn – except for “Another Suburban Romance” – were written or recorded in the 1990s.)”
MISCELLANEOUS MOORE BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION by David Hume and Greg Strokecker

Heeler LP

Image linked from coldspring.co.uk

CSR2LP (Unreleased)
Various Artists | Feeler
Split vinyl album featuring one side ALAN MOORE and the other side was to be PSYCHIC TV. This album was withdrawn before manufacture for legal reasons.

The split vinyl LP was due to be released 1991. We had gain two exclusive tracks from each artist. The writer ALAN MOORE (famous for such works as The Watchmen, etc) had put a band together called THE SATANIC NURSES and one of the first works was a track called “…Morgue.” In the line-up of the band was Kevin Haskins of BAUHAUS and LOVE & ROCKETS infamy, playing drums. Three weeks prior to release, Justin Mitchell received a telephone call from Beggars Banquet demanding that we pay for Haskins involvement. It was insisted that it was a legal necessity that his name be credited, and then we would owe “a LOT of money”. Being a label new to the expenses of vinyl manufacture (let alone MCPS, etc), we couldn’t afford it. The album had to be pulled. We heard rumours that Beggars Banquet had been impressed with the Alan Moore idea and had basically wanted it for their own. But, they released nothing similar.

We’d gone so far down the road and worked so hard to pull this record together, so to us the album was a reality, hence it’s inclusion in the official discography. The flipside was an unedited live track by Psychic TV called “New Regeneration” with a incomparable line-up: Genesis and Paula P-Orridge, Dave Ball (SOFT CELL, THE GRID), Monte Cazazza, John Gosling, Hilmar Orn Hilmarsson and Mouse. An edited version can be found on the “Live In Heaven” vinyl LP (Temple TOPY018).

Track listing:
1. …Morgue (Alan Moore)
2. New Generation (Psychic TV)
Taken from Cold Spring discography

It was recorded in Northampton by Alan, Curtis and Tim, in Tim`s home studio.
Alan Smith did the artwork.
Justin Mitchell

Full title was “Murders on the Rue Morgue”. It was also a time when very early versions of other songs were created and roughly demoed, but not played live til the Nurses morphed into the Emperors. The earliest ones I recollect were “Rue Morgue”, “Another Suburban Romance” & “Fires I wish I’d seen.” We had a lot of fun formulating the material at this time, and would sit around at Alan’s, or my house with a few refreshments and acoustic guitars etc. We did a couple of one-off gigs  (Alan/Chris/Curtis/myself) with a drum-machine and tape-effects at poetry reading type events. It all served as a warm-up for the later rock-venue productions that were to come. The few recordings we did were on half-inch analogue tape and probably lost, though there may be some recorded evidence of Emperors still around somewhere, cassette tapes even possibly!
I actually went to school with Alex as a teenager and used to free-jam with him sometimes. He was the first person to introduce Frank Zappa to me, (“Weasels ripped my flesh” I think,) so I thank him for that! Alan tried to sing the basic tune that they had cobbled together for “Suburban Romance”, musically initiated by a another Emperors Member and musical polymath who was known as “Pickle”,(real name – Michael Chown) It was all very hazy, so I took the lyrics away and composed a brand new tune & arrangement for it..something rather Brechtian in it’s flavour. Pickle went on to form a quirky Art-punk band called the “Mystery Guests” that Alan occasionally provided words for..(“Wurlitzer Junction” for example.)
Tim Perkins

Discography

Frank – compilation cassette
Northampton Musician Collective, 1992
Tracklist: Murders on the Rue Morgue, …

A Compilation Of Songs And Performances By Alan Moore And Friends CD
Universal / ILEX, 2011
CD accompanies the book, Alan Moore: Storyteller
Tracklist:
14, The Satanic Nurses – Murders on the Rue Morgue [4:58]
Also includes tracks by The Sinister Ducks, The Emperors of Ice Cream, Alan Moore / Pat Fish etc.

D-Go-Tees

Glyn Bush’s Birmingham-based band. Lineup also comprises Bridget Enever, Mark Rowson and Trevor Lines.

De-Go-Tee's line up

De-Go-Tee’s line up

1978

March:
Glyn Bush wrote Skyscraper for a proposed band. Alternate version of that song has been recorded by Alex Green for The Emperors of Ice Cream.

April:
First mention of Degootees name.

July:
First reference to Glyn Bush’s pseudonym Grant Series. Alex Green wrote imaginary reviews for the following 5 proposed D-Go-Tees songs:
The Man Made of Green Peppers
The Smell of Sex
I’m not In The Mood (for Backchat)
Razor In Particular
Whistle And Sham

Centre For The Arts, Aston University, Birmingham

Centre For The Arts, Aston University, Birmingham

1979

3 March:
Live gig with Alex Green on sax. Beside the De-Go-Tee’s songs they also played Alex’s Do The Bums Rush (originally written for The Emperors of Ice Cream)

De-Go-Tees @ The Bulls Head

De-Go-Tees @ The Bulls Head

De-Go-Tees - Alex Green's setlist

De-Go-Tees – Alex Green’s setlist

Jun (or July):

I was at the Deadly Fun Hippodrome […] I was playing with my band the De-Go-Tees […] Debbie’s Gloss was one of my songs for the De-GoTees (Grant Series being my alter-ego at the time). I may have a demo of it somewhere, but the main lyric was: ’I’m mad about the motion of Debbie’s Gloss.’
… the line up was: Grant Series (Gtr, vocs), Alex Green (sax) David Hunt (BS) Geoff Webb (drs). We were supporting Bauhaus 1919.
Glyn Bush

21 Jun:

De-Go-Tees @ Bournebrook

De-Go-Tees @ Bournebrook

De-Go-Tees @ Bournebrook

17 November:
Alex Green wrote imaginary reviews for the following 3 proposed D-Go-Tees songs:
Cancer Restaurant
TRDO
Brand New Bright Tomorrow

22 December:
Live gig @Northampton
“Possibly the best incarnation of the D-Go-T’s yet”

1980

25 April:
One of the first live gig with Bridget Enever on tenor-sax

May:
Alan Moore wrote lyrics for a De-Go-Tees song called ‘The Age of Bavaria’. Demo has been recorded few months later. Regarding Lance Parkin’s Magic Words book, second incarnation of Emperors of Ice Cream also had a song with that name, probably the same lyrics with different music.

17 July:
Alex Green wrote imaginary reviews for the following 2 proposed D-Go-Tees songs:
S.P.W
Surreal Estate

20 July:

De-Go-Tees @ Star Club

De-Go-Tees @ Star Club

27 July:

De-Go-Tees @ Barrel Organ

De-Go-Tees @ Barrel Organ

20 November:

De-Go-Tees @ Golden Eagle w/The Privates

De-Go-Tees @ Golden Eagle w/The Privates

1981

May:
Various gigs including Fighting Cocks with The Army

De-Go-Tees - '81 May gigs

De-Go-Tees – ’81 May gigs

20 August:
D-Go-tees at the Roadmender

9 October:
Live gig with Mr.Liquorice

De-Go-Tees @ Square Club

De-Go-Tees @ Square Club

De-Go-Tees @ Square Club

De-Go-Tees recordings:

1 Stress
2 Spud Beat
3 New Community
4 No Ballroom
5 I-Opener
6 Old Man’s Coat
7 Do the Bum’s Rush
8 Ego Massage Parlour
9 New Breed
10 Sweet Potatoes Warbling
11 Royal Jelly
12 Surreal Estate
13 Undecided
14 The Age of Bavaria
15 City Shelving
16 Get Back to MOR
17 MOR coda

1-4 are from the Sinewave Studio session, line up GB gtr, voc, clarinet, Bridget Enever sax, violin, Mark Rowson bs Trevor Lines drums the rest are from a recording session at Mark’s house around 1980, line up the same except it may have been Geoff Webb on drums.
7 and 10 were written by Alex Green and 14 yes the lyrics were by Alan Moore.
Glyn Bush

The Sinister Ducks (1979-1983)

Edited 05/27/2017

1979

„We’d been doing things, working together, when Bauhaus was going. There used to be an event called the Deadly Fun Hippodrome that he was partly behind. It was a little like a mad anarchic surrealist cabaret. There’s another guy called Pickle who was heavily involved in that, who later formed a band called the Mystery Guests. All the eccentric artists in Northampton would crawl out of the woodwork and turn up for this event. It’d be great. A lot of cross-fertilization going on. It was held in an old Edwardian pavilion in the middle of the Northampton race course, the old racetrack. It was an ideal old haunted ballroom.”
David J, LA Weekly interview w/ Jay Babcock

The DFH was held on Saturday lunchtimes at the Racecourse Pavilion in Northampton. There were Super 8 cartoons every week and a couple of bands. I think Bauhaus did the first one and then got too big to play for the zero pounds guaranteed fee i was able to offer. As Alan says, most of my promotions at this time were financial suicide. But then so was Woodstock! The whole series ended suddenly when a water pipe burst during one of the gigs and caused flooding damage in the tens of thousands.
Pickle (Mr. Licquorice)

1979 summer

Critters article – page 1

„The Sinister Ducks first waddled into the limelight early one Saturday afternoon in the Summer of 1979. Local new wave compoposer, entrepreneur, and Adolf Hitler lookalike Mr. Liquorice had arranged a number of lunchtime cabaret sessions which were held in a crumbling Edwardian pavilion when the sun was at its highest and the audience figures at their lowest. Combining local New Wave or Hardcore bands with vintage Augie Dawgie cartoons, this venture operated under the alluring title of „The Deadly Fun Hippodrome”, and over the single summer of its brief duration it built up a loyal audience of, literally, dozens. One one particular occasion, when the support for the band The Shapes had failed to turn up, Mr. Liquorice asked me if I could possibly form a super-group and be on stage int en minutes time. Being pretty drunk, this seemed to me a viable proposition. If I took four minutes carefully hand-picking the correct musical personnel and two minutes writing a modest twenty-minute set, this would allow almost a full one hundred and twenty seconds for rehersal. I agreed, and ten minutes later the Sinister Ducks took the stage. Other than myself, these included Bauhaus bassist David J., saxophonist Max Akropolis from the ska band ARMY, and singer-guitarist Grant Series of Birmingham’s D-Go-Tees. The audience, muddled by glue fumes though they were, were roused to a slouching ovation by a tight and professional set that included David J. reading extracts from that morning’s paper and a heart-breaking rendition of the incomprehensible ’Debbie’s Gloss’ by Grant Series on a bass guitar and half an amplifier. Reeling from this fabulous reception and concerned lest we should peak too soon we did nothing for the next two years.”
Critter #23, Animals Rock n Roll – Alan Moore, Northampton 1987

After reading the account of the Sinister Ducks outing, I can safely say that whenever they played, it wasn’t with us. Im pretty sure we would have remembered that !
Garet Holder (The Shapes)

I was at the Deadly Fun Hippodrome but don’t remember whether they played or not. I was playing with my band the De-Go-Tees and may well have been backstage at the time. Debbie’s Gloss was one of my songs for the De-GoTees (Grant Series being my alter-ego at the time). I may have a demo of it somewhere, but the main lyric was: ’I’m mad about the motion of Debbie’s Gloss.’ I certainly don’t recall the Ducks ever playing it … the line up was: Grant Series (Gtr, vocs), Alex Green (sax) David Hunt (BS) Geoff Webb (drs). We were supporting Bauhaus 1919.
Glyn Bush

„Around 1979 Mr. Liquorice started an afternoon venue for live music and old Augie Dawgie cartoons, known picturesquely as the Deadly Fun Hippodrome. Financially it was utter suicide, but we had a lot of fun. It lasted until one of the visiting punk bands ripped out all the water pipes in the ladies’ toilets, presumably as some sort of protest against the dehumanising futility of contemporary society. Anyway, during the Hippodrome’s existence the level of organization had a kind of freewheeling Marx Brothers tendency. I suppose this was our ‘Cavern’ period. That first line-up included myself, saxophonist Max Akropolis, Dave J. from Bauhaus and Glynn Bush from Birmingham’s D-Go-Tees, who happened to be passing through town that particular lunch hour. After this first half-hour performance, we decided to follow the proven example of David Bowie and maintain an aloof, inaccessible silence. This period of withdrawal from the public eye lasted for about two years, during which we didn’t rehearse or even speak to each other. „
Alan Moore, Zig Zag article (Jun 84)

„Even though Bauhaus took up most of his time, J still found time for external collaborations. He worked with one of the original Bauhaus artists, Rene Halkett and an accident led to forming a ramshackle outfit with Moore called the Sinister Ducks. “We put them together on the spot,” recalls Moore. “There was a string of gigs at a local Victorian Pavilion that a very eccentric and brilliant musician Dr Liquorice had decided to put on at Saturday lunchtime. There would be punk bands, local bands and vintage cartoons that he would show. It had a playschool air about it that was quite interesting. Anyway, one of these particular days the main band had not shown up so he asked me and David and a couple of other musicians if we could put something together in ten minutes and do a set. We quite liked the challenge, so I did a piece of reading with music in the background.”
Ian Shirley: Can Rock & Roll Save the World?: An Illustrated History of Music and Comics, 2005

„Surprisingly enough, things were to improve. In the summer of 79, Licquorice became an Impressario and undertook the production of several curious entertainments staged in a run-down Edwardian pavillion known as the Deadly Fun Hippodrome. During the venue’s tragically stunted lifespan it was to play host to such notables as the Shapes, Bauhaus, The D-Go-Tees and the seminal new-wave skiffle combo known as the Sinister Ducks. The cream of local Bohemia would gather on those distant, golden afternoons and gaze in childish rapture at the vintage Augie Dawgie and Daffy Duck cartoons projected during the intermissions. Sadly, this idyll was shattered by a ruptured waterpipe. Those of you who have experienced the surreal enormity of a flash flood on the upper floor of a two-storey Edwardian building will appreciate the trauma entailed in such an event. The bubble had burst. There were slugs in the lettuce of our salad days. Looking back, it seems somehow inevitable.”
Alan Moore, Sounds article, Mystery and Abomination”, 1981-08-08

1981-04-18 – Roadmender Club, Northampton

„April 18th 1981 and David has booked himself into Beck studios in Wellingborough to set two of the poems; Nothing and Armour to music he had recently composed… With the session completed he literally walked out of Beck and into Northampton’s Roadmender Club on Lady’s Lane to perform at a multi media event promoted by the enigmatic Mr Liquorice ‘The Summer Shock Special’. With Bauhaus currently on a brief hiatus having recently returned from a lengthy tour of the United States David played at this event as a member of another band. The Sinister Ducks was a part time project featuring David, comic writer Alan Moore and saxophonist Alex Green with ‘floating’ members like Glyn Bush and Bridget Enever.”
Sleeve notes for David J: Etiquette of Violance reissue CD by Andrew J. Brooksbank

„Sinister Ducks consisted of Alan, myself and Alex Green, a saxophonist. Also there was a floating member,(no pun intended!) Glynn Bush, who now is with Rockers Hi-Fi. We did two performances. Alan’s role was chief provocatueur. He came on dressed like a head waiter — penguin suit — and heavy leather motorcycle gloves. We performed the two pieces that’d we recorded, March of the Sinister Ducks and Old Gangsters Never Die. Old Gangsters Never Die being a precis of a play Alan had written right around the time of the Hippodrome. They put on plays as well. … I played guitar in a quite unconventional manner, Alex honked away upon the sax, one song the entire vocal was, we used those dolls where you pull out the string and get them to talk. We put the doll to the mike and put it through effects. That would be the vocal. Alan would stare at it with malicious intent. Experimental!”
David J, LA Weekly interview w/ Jay Babcock

Critters article – page 2

„The Sinister Ducks’ first reunion performance happened at another financially doomed venture carried out under the auspices of the enterprising Liquorice, this being a one-day event known as ’Summer Shock Day’. The Duck’s lineup, expanded to include D-Go-Tee saxophonist Bridget (who used to go out with Hunt Emerson), also included a plastic Minnie Mouse doll that provided the vocal upon at least one number, the immortal ’Plastic Man Goes Nuts’. The doll’s head was detachable from its body save for a length of retractable string, which, when jerked savagely, would cause the hideous toy to utter one of six cute catch-phrases at random in between bursts of jazz so freeform that it might be better described as completely boneless.”
Critter #23, Animals Rock n Roll – Alan Moore, Northampton 1987

„In 1981 we held a reunion performance and decided we’d take longer over this one, in an effort to get everything absolutely right. Most of the material was written as far in advance as the night before, and it showed in the performance. It was that much more polished and professional. In ’83 we recorded a single, and Dave took it to the people at Beggar’s Banquet. They decided to bring it out on their Situation Two label so that nobody would know they were responsible if there was any trouble.” In addition to the Sinister Ducks, Moore and David J. have also been working together on a single based on the ‘V For Vendetta’ strip. “I’ve not actually had much to do with it save for the writing, but Dave’s kept tee in touch with developments throughout, and the test pressing sounds excellent.””
Alan Moore, Zig Zag article (Jun 84)

I can only remember one or possibly two concerts – definitely the Roadmender when they did Old Gangsters Never Die. Debbie’s Gloss was one of my songs for the De-GoTees […] I think I did it solo at the Roadmender along with some tunes where I was playing a Bontempi organ.
Glyn Bush

The second Sinister Ducks’ gig was at an event i promoted called ‘The Summer Shock Special’ at the Roadmender which utilised nearly all the rooms in the building for various events and performances. Red and green food and snacks were on sale. Was also my solo debut as Mr Liquorice. Also on the bill were The Sinister Ducks,The D-Go-tees,a performance group called Living Room
Pickle (Mr. Licquorice)

I’m afraid I have a very hazy recollection of the gig. I remember the toy being played held up to the microphone, but then there was a bit of a fad for clockwork toy noises incorporated into stage events at the time. I’m not sure whether John Dowie was involved somewhere, with ‘Big Girls Blouse’, but that was possibly another occasion. Setlist? What makes you think we were that well organised?? Or rehearsed?? More go with the flow…. As for myself, I joined in with and improvised with just about anybody in those days without any prior knowledge of the content – just used my ears! Still do…
Bridget Enever

1982

Bauhaus Information Club newsletter, 1982

Bauhaus Information Club newsletter, 1982

„Although Dave J has no definite release plans, amongst other projects he plans to ‘conduct’ (ha ha) a local gig, on a local bus, to „whoever happens to be on the damn thing at the time”. He’s doing it with his spare time superstars called the „SINISTER DUCKS” who feature a stunning sinister prose vocalist who goes by the delightful name of Brilburnlouge (see MASK sleeve notes). Who is this you may ask? Little do we know, except for anonymous breathtaking phone calls received from the above, reciting „old gangsters never die” to which the sinister quadruplets back up. This being a possible single on release on 4AD.”
Bauhaus Information Club newsletter, 1982

Tranks to Flavio

‘Transport of Delight’ article. Thanks to Flavio.

The Sinister Ducks 7" RARE test pressing

The Sinister Ducks 7″ RARE test pressing

1983-07-19 – on a narrow boat, Northampton

„July  1983 the celebration of another birthday, this time his brother Kevin’s 23rd. An unusual setting for a party, aboard a canal barge on the river Nene, the primary water  in Northampton that eventually feeds into The Wash in East Anglia. Amongst those providing the entertainment that day (19th July) are a duo; The Jazz Butcher and King Rolo (the latter would shortly form The Woodentops) and The Sinister Ducks who also play a couple of numbers and it’s this performance, their third and final, that prompts David to approach his record company with the idea of The Ducks recording a single. Incidentally following this “birthday show” Kevin made a surprise appearance at Kensington’s Ad-Lib club on the 25th playing drums for The Jazz Butcher.”
Sleeve notes for David J: Etiquette of Violance reissue CD by Andrew J. Brooksbank

„…the Ducks rose to the challenge by performing for the glitterati at the birthday celebration of Bauhaus drummer Kevin Haskins, on a corroded barge sailing down the river Nene int he middle of the night.” „…they provided a cursory runthrough of their hit single ([…]) before breaking up over irreconcilable musical differences on their way back to the bar at the rear of the barge.”
Critter #23, Animals Rock n Roll – Alan Moore, Northampton 1987

It must have been a really good party as I have no recollection of it! It may have happened or it may have been confused with my wedding reception which took place on a narrow boat, on the canals surrounding Northampton. The boat was called the Saucy Sue and we had a costume wedding (all guests in fancy dress). Now Alex Green along with Pat Fish were the wedding band! So there is a connection there with Alex. But it wasn’t a Sinister Ducks performance.
Kevin Haskins

Sinister Ducks Press pack

Sinister Ducks Press pack
Thanks to Andrew J. Brooksbank

„The Single was recorded at Beck Studios in Northampton (Wellingborough). ‘March Of The Sinister Ducks’ was built up in layers on top of a basic structure of Dave’s guitar and piano. The cabaret saxophones on the choruses were augmented with kazoos played by Alan and myself. Vocals and duck effect came later. ‘Old Gangsters Never Die‘ was recorded live with us all together in the same room, I seem to recall that the version released was the third take.”
Alex Green, Apollox, 1995

„Created in 1981 by Peter Kent (initially one half of 4AD with Ivo-Watts Russel) as an alternate to Beggars Banquet and to create appeal to an ever growing indie audience Situation Two funded a Sinister Ducks single; March Of The Sinister Ducks and Old Gangsters Never Die. Built largely around David’s guitar and Alex’s piano, the saxophones were augmented by Kazoos for the chorus, played by all three with vocals and assorted duck noises for March Of… added post production. Old Gangsters Never Die was originally a soliloquy in the surrealist play Another Suburban Romance written by Alan Moore and Jamie Delano. Issued in  a special fold out sleeve with stunning artwork from Edwin Pouncy better known of course as comic scribbler Savage Pencil augmented by contributions from another comic artist Kevin O’Neil. Also included within the package was a short band member biography, albeit under pseudonyms; The Translucia Baboon for example was Alan Moore, Alex Green as Max Acropolis whilst David appears as Captain Jose De Silva. The single was released by Situation Two on the 26th of August. There were vague plans for a second e.p. but this eventually came to nothing.”
Sleeve notes for David J: Etiquette of Violance reissue CD by Andrew J. Brooksbank

„The Sinister Ducks did a few concerts and it was obvious to J that they should record a single. “It was easy. We went to Beck Studios where we did all of our Bauhaus stuff and Alan wrote the words. The ‘B’ Side – “Old Gangsters Never Die” – was part of a play that he had written that dated back to the Arts Lab before I had met him. He resurrected it and made it into a pop song and me and Alan put some music to it.” The Sinister Ducks single was released in 1983 and received some intriguing reviews. Due to Moore’s appearance, the single is quite colleetable today not only for the music – uh the lyrics go “quack, quack!” – but the delightful fine art packaging. ‘It was two way traflic — comics and music.” recalls Moore. “It has got a Kevin O’Neill cover on it. There is a rare comic strip version of Old Gangsters Never Die done by Lloyd Thatcher. There is a Savage Pencil graphic on the back, which Sav was telling me was the first time that he had drawn his subsequently popular Dirty Duck character. He got the idea fiom the Sinister Ducks.” The Sinister Ducks even performed on water at Bauhaus drummer Kevin Hawkins’ birthday party on a canal barge.”
Ian Shirley: Can Rock & Roll Save the World?: An Illustrated History of Music and Comics, 2005

Sinister Ducks promo badges

Sinister Ducks promo badges
Thanks to Andrew J. Brooksbank

Discography

The March of The Sinister Ducks 7″ single
SIT 25, Situation Two, 1983

Fully signed 7″. Thanks to Andrew J. Brooksbank

Tracklist:

Suiside: March of The Sinister Ducks

Homiside: Old Gangsters Never Die

 

Critters #23 flexi disc
1033161ABX, F.B.I. Music & Noise, 1986
Tracklist:
Round Side: Teddy Payne & The Bluebears – Right To The Blues
Flat Side : The Sinister Ducks – March Of The Sinister Ducks

Critters Flexi disc

A Compilation Of Songs And Performances By Alan Moore And Friends CD
Universal / ILEX, 2011
CD accompanies the book, Alan Moore: Storyteller
Tracklist:
02, The Sinister Ducks – March Of The Sinister Ducks [2:42]
Also includes tracks by Satanic Nurses, The Emperors of Ice Cream, Alan Moore / Pat Fish etc.

David J : Etiquette of Violance reissue CD
CDBRED604, Cherry Red, 2013
Tracklist:
CD 2 / 16 : Old Gangster Never Die (remastered) [6:42]
CD 2 / 17 : March Of The Sinister Ducks (remastered) [2:41]

England Their England : Monsters Maniacs And Moore
Central TV documentary, 1987
Tracklist:
March Of The Sinister Ducks (ducks video, see below @1:30)
Old Gangster Never Die (excerpt, lip-synched performance by Alan Moore, see below @8:12)

Song list

The March of The Sinister Ducks
An original song with lyrics & lead vocals by Alan Moore. Released on 7″ single and played live.
Old Gangster Never Die
An original song with lyrics & lead vocals by Alan Moore. Released on 7″ single and played live.
Debbie’s Gloss
Regarding the Critters article it was played live at the very first Ducks gig by Grant Series (although he has no recollection of it). Also played live by the D-Go-Tees.
Plastic Man Goes Nuts
Also mentioned in the Critters article by Alan Moore. It could be an original song.
Nightflyers
An original song with lyrics & lead vocals by Alan Moore.
Last Night
An original song with lyrics & lead vocals by David J.
Poem
A spoken word piece by David J.
I Get A Kick Out Of You
An (almost) acapella cover of Frank Sinatra’s classic with lead vocals by Alan Moore.

The Army (1980-1982)

Lineup:
Jono Bell (vocals), Adrian Utley (guitar), Coach York (drums), Alex Green (sax), Scott Graham (bass)

The Army live/studio dates (very incomplete list)
1980-03-21 – location/venue unknown
1980-04-19 – Scotland
1980-04-29 – audition in London (for a work in South France)
1980-06-12/15 – Horizon Studios (rec of 1st single)
1980-06-08 – Nags Head, Wollaston
1980-06-09/11 – studio
1980-06-13 – London (support for the Photos)
1980-09-15 – The Venue (w/ The Viewers)
1980-11-29 – location/venue unknown
1980-12-05 – location/venue unknown (w/ Den Haggerty)
1980-12-06 – Lion

Singles:
Shuffle Shuffle / Trendy 7″
Kick It Down / Mr. Average 7″

MP3 of both singles available at Tone And Wave blog.